The Tenant, 2010
Rivane Neuenschwander and Cao Guimarães
High definition digital film projection
Running time: 10 minutes,
34 second loop

Annie Heckman
Letter to Mircea (detail), 2014
gouache, ink, & graphite on paper
17 x 11 inches

Annie Heckman
Letter to Mircea (detail), 2014
gouache, ink, & graphite on paper
17 x 11 inches

(Source: mafroo, via blackmountainmass)

https://vimeo.com/100060958

I’d like to share Please, a new video project with a long list of amazing co-authors. My colleagues at Schurz High School and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago documented the process beautifully on the Schurz contemporary artists site. My thanks go to my collaborators at the museum and in the school. The process was one of co-authorship, with Schurz artists creating many of the source drawings for this piece. The title is a reference to lyrics in the song that is being pulled apart in the video, for any New Order fans who can guess. In this piece I’m thinking of coming of age stories visually, without text or script, remembering what it was like to draw and hide when I was a teen. In this piece I ask high school students to join me in this process.


Please
Annie Heckman, 2014
video, 1 minute, 54 seconds
with Vanessa King (instructor) and Schurz High School artists: Angelina Alvarez, Shaina Anderson, Arlo Andino, Eduardo Araiza, Shassel Correa, Carlos Delgadillo, Laura Esparza, Adrian Flores, Jovanni Garcia, Rodrigo Gomez, Jesus Jimenez, Carlos Martinez, Lorena Martinez, Ezequiel Rebolledo, Omar Rodriguez, Ricky Rodriguez, Rebecca Saenz, Cassandra Villegas

Coordinated by Jason Pallas and Lydia Ross, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago Partner School program

Preserving Tibetan Art, Dance, and Culture in Chicago


Tibetan Alliance of Chicago

A group of 11-year-old members at the Alliance spearheaded this project, scripting and directing the video to help raise funds for some much-needed renovations at their community center. My students at DePaul assisted in the video’s completion and are making a longer video that will be one of the Kickstarter prizes. Please share & support! 

Homage à François Couperin (1978) 2m, dir. Philip Stapp. Also known as “Butterflies”. A three-minute fantasy of butterflies and dragonflies cavorting amongst the pussywillows, Japanese-inspired animation accompanied by two variations on keyboard works by the Baroque composer. Uses a pointillist technique to provide a stroboscopic illusion where recognizable shapes become fluid abstractions, and where time is stretched to reveal the main patterns of the choreography. Exhibits a visual haiku wherein an invisible air current stirs the leaves of grass and blows back the butterflies. For more on director Philip Stapp, visit www.afana.org/stapp.htm

William Basinski - Disintegration Loop 6 (dlp6) - YouTube

Annie Heckman, Peru, 1953 (Trephining Letter), curated by Lindsey Thiemandetail: The brain jar, 2013The International Museum of Surgical Science, on view through August 25, 2013
photo courtesy of Nathan Keay

Annie Heckman, Peru, 1953 (Trephining Letter), curated by Lindsey Thieman
detail: The brain jar, 2013
The International Museum of Surgical Science, on view through August 25, 2013


photo courtesy of Nathan Keay

an article from Tough Little Birds on the exhibit Between Heaven and Earth: Birds in Ancient Egypt
photo caption from the site:

“Barn Owl sculpture. Owls were unusual in Egyptian art for being depicted face-on instead of in profile, as most animals (including humans) were.
Photo by Anna Ressman. Courtesy of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago.”

an article from Tough Little Birds on the exhibit Between Heaven and Earth: Birds in Ancient Egypt


photo caption from the site:

Barn Owl sculpture. Owls were unusual in Egyptian art for being depicted face-on instead of in profile, as most animals (including humans) were.

Photo by Anna Ressman. Courtesy of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago.”

Kiki Smith, Bird Skeleton, 2000

Kiki Smith, Bird Skeleton, 2000